Employment references

Job references

Employees and freelance employees are entitled to a certificate called in Germany “Zeugnis”.

The prerequisite is a permanent employment relationship so that the assessor has enough time to recognize the professional and personal qualities of the employee.

Person entitled to issue the reference certificate „Zeugnis“

 The only person entitled to issue the reference certificate is the employer, but a superior of the employee can also take the assessment. Exhibitor of the certificate is the employer, but a superior of the employee can also take the assessment. It is important that the assessor is instructed to do so from the employer.  The “grade” of the assessor is recorded in the certificate. External persons are not allowed to issue certificates of work reference. If an insolvency administrator continues to employ an employee, he must issue a certificate. In the case of the death of the company owner the duty to create a reference certificate will be inherited. The person inheriting the business must write a certificate from the records.  

When are you going to receive your “Zeugnis” in Germany?

The right to receive a reference certificate begins with the notice of termination period. Legally the claim to a reference certificate actually arises with the official end of the employment relationship, i.e. on the last working day. Usually, the employee can already apply for his/her certificate beforehand with his/her ordinary dismissal. The reference certificate will be used for new applications as the employee has to be facilitated in finding another job for further employers.

Issuing the reference certificate

The employee must collect the reference certificate from the employer. If the certificate is not yet ready by the end of the employment relationship, the employer must send it per post/email to the employee. The employer has to pay the costs.

Working hours in Germany

Working hours and allowed breaks

When should you start working? How many breaks do you have? How long does your break last? How have your working hours been distributed throughout the whole week?

All those information will be provided to you in your contract of employment.

Daily working time

According to the Working Time Act (Arbeitszeitgesetz), the maximum working time per day is eight hours. This time can be extended to up to ten hours. Prerequisite: in six months (24 weeks) the average of your working hours should not exceed 8 hours a day.

Breaks and rest periods

According to the Arbeitszeitgesetz, the following breaks-settlements apply:

 

Working Hours Resting Time
From 6 Hours 30 Minutes
From 9 Hours 45 Minutes

 

The total resting time can be divided in small breaks: e.g. a 30-Minutes break can be divided in 2 breaks x 15-Min. each. There must be at least 11 hours rest period between two working days. Employees may not be working on Sundays and Holidays but exceptions are allowed.

Youth Protection

Pursuant to the Youth Health and Safety at Work Act (Jugendarbeitsschutzgesetz), young employees (under 18) are not allowed to work for more than eight hours a day (for a maximum of 40 hours a week). The employer has to allow underage workers to take days off in order to go to school, if it is the case.

For them, the following resting hours-list applies:

Working Hours Resting Time
From 4,5 Hours 30 Minutes
From 6 Hours 60 Minutes

 

Maternity leave

The following working times are not allowed to pregnant women:

  • Extra-hours
  • Night-shifts (8PM-6AM)

Working on Sundays and holidays.